How to stay fit when you have type 1 diabetes

The team at isoshealth enjoyed reading this useful article in the telegraph a few months ago.  It very much reminded us of the need to get tailored bespoke advice  on fitness and well-being.

We are very happy to share the  advice given but with the caveat that we are all different .  Broad trends and advice can be useful but its much more reassuring to have a one to one consultation with a  physiotherapist or dietitian  who understands your unique circumstances.

Carbohydrate intake during exercise

“If you are exercising intensely or over an extended period of time you’re likely to need extra carbohydrate during exercise. Less carbohydrate is required the longer it was since your last insulin injection.”

After you exercise

“Be aware the around eight to 12 hours after you exercise, your blood glucose level could drop too low. This is because your adrenalin levels drop and your muscles and liver will start to take up extra glucose to replace their stores. You will need to take this into account when estimating your insulin dose prior to, or immediately after, exercise.

“Checking your blood glucose before and then every few hours after exercise, and recording what exercise you do and food you’re eating, will make it easier to see trends and assist you and your healthcare team to develop good ways of managing it.

“If you exercise in the late evening after dinner, it may increase the risk of a hypo overnight, often around 2-3am. To reducing the risk of this, you might need to take less evening insulin or eat a low GI snack before bed.

“In general, if your insulin levels during exercise were sufficient, your blood glucose should be back down to your pre-exercise level within three to six hours, without additional insulin.”