Weight loss and well-being apps – do they help?

As Christmas shopping deadlines get closer, devices and apps that track food intake, exercise frequency and duration, as well as sleep cycles and stress, will be advertised as an important aid to living a healthier lifestyle. But is it a wise investment – can tech help us achieve our health and well -being goals?

Those of us who already have such devices are probably putting them away until the new year when the country seems to go on a loose weight/get fitter/ feel better/fit in those jeans resolution. And others may be trying on their new watches and wrist bands, and scanning their newly downloaded apps for advice and data clues to help them power into the new year.

But will it help?

Apps and devices are of course, easier to use than a paper and pencil record of food intake or exercise, but they also require discipline and motivation and a liking for being organised and and a willingness to be totally honest with yourself. Apps that track exercise are on the whole easy to use as well, but are irrelevant if the individual wearing the activity tracking device is nit actually moving or has left the thing at home when they hit the gym. Suggestions on changing behavior to reduce emotional overeating or decrease portion size are sensible and may work, if followed. Users can benefit from these Apps because they are able to improve the nutritional quality of what is eaten, or motivate exercise because the App gives instant praise when physical activity occurs. But are Apps able to motivate the disinterested or discouraged dieter? Are there Apps that entice users who stop tracking food consumption or refuse to exercise to begin again? Are there Apps that really understand why we eat too much? Maybe the next generation of such devices will accomplish this. Or maybe not.

We asked our practitioner ambassadors for their views.

Adam Mufti Physiotherapist commented :

Apps can be an excellent way to keep yourself motivated and keep yourself on track with exercise. Apps which incorporate programmes such as the couch to 5K can help pacing, build endurance and get people into running while keeping achievable goals.
Other apps can show you good technique for exercises in the gym, and others, such as strava, can be a great social platform to share activities with friends and family and keep you motivated.

Susan Burry Dietitian comments:

Dietary apps can be helpful for some people in the short term, they can help people know if they are eating the correct macronutrients and portion sizes. dietitians can help with this process by giving guidance on how to meet the clients targets. But important not to use in the long term, just enough to get you on track!

And finally Catherine Steele Psychologist added to the summaries:

Diet and wellbeing apps are a great way to track your progress against set goals and the notifications can be really helpful in keeping us motivated. But.. they do need to be carefully managed to make sure they are supporting us not creating more pressure!

For example the need to regularly enter data such as food and drink can become another task on top of our already unnamable to list so think about how you can best make it work for you. Be careful not to check in too often and become don’t obsessed with the device. If you miss a day or two of tracking it will be ok!

How to stay fit when you have type 1 diabetes

The team at isoshealth enjoyed reading this useful article in the telegraph a few months ago.  It very much reminded us of the need to get tailored bespoke advice  on fitness and well-being.

We are very happy to share the  advice given but with the caveat that we are all different .  Broad trends and advice can be useful but its much more reassuring to have a one to one consultation with a  physiotherapist or dietitian  who understands your unique circumstances.

Carbohydrate intake during exercise

“If you are exercising intensely or over an extended period of time you’re likely to need extra carbohydrate during exercise. Less carbohydrate is required the longer it was since your last insulin injection.”

After you exercise

“Be aware the around eight to 12 hours after you exercise, your blood glucose level could drop too low. This is because your adrenalin levels drop and your muscles and liver will start to take up extra glucose to replace their stores. You will need to take this into account when estimating your insulin dose prior to, or immediately after, exercise.

“Checking your blood glucose before and then every few hours after exercise, and recording what exercise you do and food you’re eating, will make it easier to see trends and assist you and your healthcare team to develop good ways of managing it.

“If you exercise in the late evening after dinner, it may increase the risk of a hypo overnight, often around 2-3am. To reducing the risk of this, you might need to take less evening insulin or eat a low GI snack before bed.

“In general, if your insulin levels during exercise were sufficient, your blood glucose should be back down to your pre-exercise level within three to six hours, without additional insulin.”